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Poster: light into ashes Date: Aug 22, 2011 10:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

Yeah, I thought it was interesting - he was really hearing what the Dead were doing, and made an effort to relate what he heard in concert to previous albums, but unfortunately tried to describe it in this intellectual way that he wasn't quite up to. Definitely a music student - I was struck by his use of terms like "imitation" and "motive," had to look them up & found that they're genuine musical terms.
It's a bad sign, though, when you have to look up the writer's terms to guess what he's talking about... I think the reviewer's mind might have been rather, um, cloudy when he was writing this - a lot of confused sentence structure, vague terms, etc! But we all know how many college papers read like that...

But still worth it to see that even in '72 there were hardcore deadheads saying, "Life is a Grateful Dead concert; all else but an interim."

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Aug 22, 2011 10:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

>we all know how many college papers read like that

Seriously now, I've got to defend the guy again. College papers read like that?! I edit the work of people with long strings of degrees after their names, and often it is not as well written as that review. Many college kids today can't write papers at all, they just buy them on the Internet.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Aug 22, 2011 11:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

Ah, sorry, I was thinking 1972 college standards, not today's standards! :)

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Poster: adks12020 Date: Aug 23, 2011 5:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

I just want to point out that professors these days have computer programs that will find evidence of plagiarism in about a minute. I know it's easy to talk about the good old days having better standards but it just isn't true. College is way more competitive now than it's ever been and you can't just whip up a plagiarised paper without getting caught most assuming the teacher isn't stupid...excerpt from NPR affiliate regarding a story on famous quotations...

"Literary Review “Academics like me are skilled users of turnitin.com. Never heard of it? Ask the nearest undergraduate and watch their cheek blanch. Turnitin is the trade’s leading ‘plagiarism detector’. You upload the student’s essay or dissertation and it’s checked against trillions of words and phrases in seconds.”

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Aug 23, 2011 5:50am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

Oh, I know, I agree really, I am always skeptical of the notion that "Everything is worse nowdays" wherever it's applied, and academics is definitely one such place. I think school is much tougher now than when I went ... I'd be judged a turnip intellectually now at the schools my son has attended.

But as long as we're being contrary, I think the plagiarism detection programs are overrated also. Often, you can detect plagiarism by copying and pasting a paragraph or two into google. The programs catch more subtle cases, I suppose.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Aug 23, 2011 10:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

Everyone uses it in the sciences; and unless I am doing a writing intensive class, I simply stopped assigning the classic term paper (there are other more efficient means of teaching writing, reviewing the lit, etc., etc.).

It only takes a line or two to detect the issue; it's easy for profs to run their term papers through it, so students are starting to get the message.

As to "then and now", from having never left the field, and from both sides (three boys in or finished), the biggest difference is the web/etc allowing students to find online courses (everywhere now, yuck) that are so absurdly easy it is just a joke. Seriously--had sons do an ave of 30 min work a week for 3 credit course. Some online courses are good, but students gravitate toward the easy ones. Duh--I would have too.

That said, Cal in the 70s was tough; Cal today is tough. No real change there, in spite of my blather above. You get what you put into it, of course, and great educations can be had at most any recognized state school cross the country. But, you can get "an easy degree" much more easily today that 30 yrs ago, just due to the web, etc., info exchange, blah, blah, blah.

IMnotsoHO.

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Poster: adks12020 Date: Aug 23, 2011 6:01am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: a student review in '72

yeah I graduated back in 2004 and I actually used to help roomates write papers. I remember reading one of my friend's and thinking something sounded familiar so I googled the quote...sure enough he lifted it without citation. I mean it fit in the paper perfectly but I was like "man if the quote is familiar to me and you can google it, you'd better cite it"

I actually still google things like that. It drives me nuts when I remember hearing or reading something but I can't figure out where.